Recently, I came across an article about the United States Marine Corps “Rule of Three”. Essentially the Rule is about picking three goals, focusing on them and doing them well before adding more tasks.  This principle can guide parents as they try to figure out what is in the best interest of their children in an Albuquerque child custody case. Focus on the three most important goals you want to accomplish with your child custody case.  If you know what those three goals are, focus your efforts on obtaining results in your case. Here are 3 goals you can focus on now to help you succeed in your Albuquerque custody case.

#1.  Be honest with yourself about the type of time-sharing schedule you want with your children and that it is for the right reasons.  You may want equal sharing time because you want to spend as much time as possible with your children, but if, deep down the actual reason is that you want to keep your child support payments low, you are seeking the 50-50 time-sharing for the wrong reasons.  If your work schedule is not flexible enough for the time-sharing schedule you want, offer a reasonable time-sharing schedule that you can follow and modify later if your work schedule changes.

 

#2.  Stop trying to normalize a split time-sharing schedule.  If you are trying to keep everything as normal as possible as when you lived under one roof with the other parent, you are making a mistake.  Split households with time-sharing are not normal and are very difficult to make work. Under the best of conditions, it is challenging for the parents to be on the same page.   You have to realize your attempt at keeping things normal may do more harm than good in your custody case and can actually have the opposite effect.  

 

#3.  Do not underestimate the power of effective co-parenting.  You may not like the other parent very much, but have to be able to be civil with them.  You do not have to be best friends with the other parent or show a united front in front of them, but, you must communicate effectively.  If you do not communicate well with the other parent concerning major events that affect the children, you will have difficulty a co-parenting experience.  Part of effective communication is to listen and be objective in your communications with the other parent. Seek clarity when necessary. You should place yourself in the shoes of the other parent when providing them information about the children.  Effective communications will keep tensions low between the parents. Rule of thumb, if you are communicating now, you need to communicate more.  

 

If you want more information about your Albuquerque, New Mexico, child custody case, contact the lawyers at Genus Law Group at 505-317-4455.


 
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